aspacewanderer
aspacewanderer:

uwmarchives:

It’s Archives Month! Archives all around the state of Wisconsin are sharing fantastic images through this Wisconsin Historical Society Flickr album.
Explore the collection of photos from these Wisconsin archives and tell us: what is your favorite photo?

Yay, Milwaukee, yay! This is my work project! Everyone look at it and admire Wisconsin’s beauty and grace. And then visit your local archives. All of them. Every day. All October.

Thanks for your work on this project!

aspacewanderer:

uwmarchives:

It’s Archives Month! Archives all around the state of Wisconsin are sharing fantastic images through this Wisconsin Historical Society Flickr album.

Explore the collection of photos from these Wisconsin archives and tell us: what is your favorite photo?

Yay, Milwaukee, yay! This is my work project! Everyone look at it and admire Wisconsin’s beauty and grace. And then visit your local archives. All of them. Every day. All October.

Thanks for your work on this project!

uwmspeccoll

uwmspeccoll:

We’ve been hammered by the beginning of the fall semester, so it’s taken some time to respond the book challenge presented to us by beckerrarebooks. Even though we are not noted for our science collections, we decided to follow the example of the past few challenge responses by focusing on the science-related publications we love to highlight whenever given the opportunity. Here are ten of some of our faves in publication-date order:

John Gerard. The Herball or Generall Historie of Plantes. London: Iohn Norton, 1597. One of the most popular of English herbals, this first edition of Gerard’s Herball is profusely illustrated with detailed, woodcut images that probably served as a source for Shakespeare, among others. It is also notable for presenting the first published illustration of the American potato.

Gaspar Schott.  Physica curiosa, sive mirabilia naturæ et artis … . Herbipolis (Würzburg): J.A. Endteri & Wolffgangi jun. hæredum, excudebat J. Hertz, 1662. Two volumes. Gaspar Schott was a German Jesuit who maintained an interest in science and mathematics, producing numerous works on mathematics, physics, and magic, none of which were based on any first-hand research. Physica curiosa is a supplement to Schott’s most well-known work Magia universalis naturæ et artis (1657–1659). Frankly, we like to drag this publication out simply for its fantastic images of elephant-headed people, jackalopes, Albrecht Dürer-inspired rhinoceroses, and other such nonsense.

Francesco Redi. Esperienze Intorno alla Generazione degl’Insetti. Firenze: All’insegna della Stella, 1668. Redi’s famous refutation of spontaneous generation. This volume also includes one of the first detailed descriptions of ectoparasites, especially ticks. The numerous copperplate engravings of these tiny arachnids, with decorative, scrolling label ribbons above them, give these bloodsuckers an almost vaunted, monumental appearance.

Marcello Malpighi. Opera posthuma. Amsterdam: Donatum Donati, 1698. A posthumous publication (Malpighi died in 1694) of the works of the father of microscopical anatomy and histology. Malphigian tubules, anyone!?

John Harris. Astronomical dialogues between a gentleman and a lady: wherein the doctrine of the sphere, uses of the globes, and the elements of astronomy and geography are explain’d in a pleasant, easy and familiar way. London: Printed by T. Wood for B. Cowse, 1719.  Early science education for women; the title says it all.

Isaac Newton. Philosophiae naturalis principia mathematica. Amsterdam: Sumptibus Societatis, 1723. The second Amsterdam printing of the “greatest work in the history of science.” The invention of calculus, the theory of gravity, the principles of time, force, and motion — just the basis for the development of modern physical science, that’s all.

Joseph Priestley. Experiments and Observations on Different Kinds of Air. London : Printed for J. Johnson … , 1781-1784. Three volumes. Third corrected edition of Priestley’s report on his experiments with gases leading to his discovery of oxygen, or as he preferred to call it, “dephlogisticated air.”

John Dalton. A New System of Chemical Philosophy. Manchester: Printed by S. Russell for R. Bickerstaff, London, 1808-27. Three volumes. One of the earliest descriptions of molecular structure and the theory of atomic weights by this pioneer in the development of modern atomic theory.

François Marie Guyonneau de Pambour. A Practical Treatise on Locomotive Engines Upon Railways. Philadelphia: E.L. Carey & A. Hart, 1836. Early treatise on choo-choos — with diagrams!! First Philadelphia printing after the first French edition published in Paris in 1835.

François André Michaux. The North American Sylva. Philadelphia: Rice & A. N. Hart, 1857. Five volumes. American reissue of Michaux’s monumental work first published in French and then in English translation by Augustus Lucas Hillhouse. The last two volumes in this set are an addition by English botanist Thomas Nutall that includes descriptions of the tress “not Described in the Work of F. Andrew Michaux.” The combined five volumes include hundreds of exquisite hand-colored lithographs.

Of course, there are many more we would like to include, but we agree with beckerrarebooks about the American Civil War Medical and Surgical History (we too have a copy of the six-volume set). We’re especially intrigued by the fabulous chromolithographs of bullet wounds (yes, we also have a particular affinity for zombies, vampires, and velociraptors here in Special Collections).

So, who’s next? How about: udspeccoll and dukelibraries? What are your top ten books in your collections?  
uwmspeccoll

uwmspeccoll:

Today is International Translators Day!! Why today? Because it’s the feast day of St. Jerome, the patron saint of translators (and, of course, librarians). To mark this day we are presenting a text by our very own Max Yela, Head of Special Collections. Max’s English-language story of a childhood incident, La bendición, was translated into Spanish by Rino Avellaneda and Catherine Jagoe and hand-printed at the Arcadian Press in Stevens Point, Wisconsin, by book artist Caren Heft in 2008. This bilingual edition of 50 copies was printed on paper made at the Root River Mill by Brian Borchardt, Jeff Morin, and Caren Heft. The exposed-spine binding with etched-glass covers were fabricated by Julie Sittler with assistance from Kay Zuelsdorf.

After several attempts to achieve an appropriate translation (including a particularly atrocious job by the author himself), Rino Avellaneda and Catherine Jagoe proved to be the perfect translators for this intimate story of family and the power of tradition. This is your day Rino and Catherine!!

Merrill Hall was acquired in 1964 when UWM purchased the Milwaukee-Downer College campus. Named for William P. Merrill (1817-1898) and his wife, Elizabeth. A pioneer Milwaukee industrialist, Merrill contributed $10,000 for Merrill Memorial Chapel, a north wing of the building, in memory of his wife.

Occupied by the Communication Department since 1964, Merrill was renovated along with Johnston and Greene Halls from 1980-1982.

Exterior view of Merrill Hall :: UWM Photo Collection

Exterior view of Merrill Hall :: UWM Photo Collection

Courtyard of Holton, Merrill, and Johnston Halls :: UWM Photo Collection

beckerrarebooks
cityoflondonlibraries:

The Virtue and Use of Coffee with regard to the Plague and other Infectious Distempers. 
Bradley said he could give up anytime he wanted, didn’t even like the taste. Then wrote this whole text in ten minutes after downing twelve cups before passing out in Mrs. Miggins’ pie shop. True Story.
Note: Our legal team (Bob) would like me to make clear this is not a true story.

cityoflondonlibraries:

The Virtue and Use of Coffee with regard to the Plague and other Infectious Distempers

Bradley said he could give up anytime he wanted, didn’t even like the taste. Then wrote this whole text in ten minutes after downing twelve cups before passing out in Mrs. Miggins’ pie shop. True Story.

Note: Our legal team (Bob) would like me to make clear this is not a true story.

Built in 1910, Garland Hall came to UWM through the purchase of the Milwaukee-Downer College campus in 1964. The building was initially known as Vogel Hall, but it was renamed after author Hamlin Garland.  The English Department resided in Garland Hall from 1961 until 1972.  The hall is now the home to the Psychology department, Centers for International Studies and Latin America, and the Letter and Science Honors Program.

Garland Hall exterior :: UWM Photo Collection

Bicycling near Garland Hall :: UWM Photo Collection

Pearse and Garland Halls :: UWM Photo Collection

uwmspeccoll

uwmspeccoll:

It’s Fine Press Friday!

In honor of the end of Banned Books Week 2014, we are sharing yet another Limited Editions Club piece: James Joyce’s Ulysses, featuring illustrations and original prints by renowned artist Henri Matisse.

First published serially in The Little Review from 1918-1921, Ulysses was first printed in full in Paris by Shakespeare and Company in 1922. Censorship of Ulysses had already begun with The Little Review and the novel remained banned in the United States until 1934. Here in Special Collections, we have a complete run of The Little Review. Our sister department, uwmarchives, has the records of The Little Review, including those related to the obscenity trial and the banning of Ulysses.  

Designed by George Macy, this edition of Ulysses is set in linotype Scotch Roman and printed on rag paper from the Worthy Paper Company.  The work was printed at the Limited Editions Club Printing Office in 1935 in a run of 1500 copies. The binding is of dark brown Bancroft Buckram, embossed with a design by Leroy Appleton done in gold bas-relief. Most notably, Ulysses also features six original copperplate etchings and twenty photogravure reproductions of Matisse’s original sketches for the etchings on colored paper. The entire edition is signed by Matisse, but only 250 copies were also signed by James Joyce. Special Collections holds two copies, signed by both Matisse and Joyce. 

See it in the catalog here

Built in 1934, Chapman Hall was named after benefactress Alice G. Chapman. 1.4 million was spent to restore the building, completed in 1995 ($2,177,830 in 2014). Chapman served as the college library for UWM predecessor institution Milwaukee-Downer College until 1964, when the school sold its campus, moved to Appleton, WI, and merged with Lawrence College to form Lawrence University.

Besides the library, Chapman Hall housed a reception hall paneled with richly carved East Indian teakwood. Known as the Teakwood Room, the panels had come from the Chapman family home. The panels moved to Lawrence University in 1964.

Chapman Hall :: UWM Photo Collection

Chapman Hall :: UWM Photo Collection

Chapman Hall :: UWM Photo Collection