Curtin Hall is home to the Departments of English; French, Italian, and Comparative Literature; Foreign Languages and Linguistics; English as a Second Language; Spanish and Portuguese; and Philosophy. The Center for Twenty First Century Studies (initially Twentieth Century Studies) also is housed in Curtain Hall. The building is named for Jeremiah Curtin, a linguist, translator, author, diplomat, and ethnologist who spent his early life in Milwaukee County.
Curtin Hall :: UWM Photo Collection

Curtin Hall is home to the Departments of English; French, Italian, and Comparative Literature; Foreign Languages and Linguistics; English as a Second Language; Spanish and Portuguese; and Philosophy. The Center for Twenty First Century Studies (initially Twentieth Century Studies) also is housed in Curtain Hall. The building is named for Jeremiah Curtin, a linguist, translator, author, diplomat, and ethnologist who spent his early life in Milwaukee County.

Curtin Hall :: UWM Photo Collection

Originally called the Marietta House, the Milwaukee State Teachers College bought the building from the Brumder family in 1946 and used it as a cooperative dormitory until 1970. The building was renamed in 1989 after the wife of Bert Hefter, retired president of Milprint, Inc. The building is now used as a conference center.

Hefter Conference Center, formerly Marietta House :: UWM Photo Collecton

Hefter Conference Center, formerly Marietta House :: UWM Photo Collection

Hefter Conference Center, formerly Marietta House :: UWM Photo Collection

awesomearchives

awesomearchives:

Photogrammar is a web-based platform for organizing, searching, and visualizing the 170,000 photographs from 1935 to 1945 created by the United States Farm Security Administration and Office of War Information (FSA-OWI).

The above photos are from New Jersey, Hawaii, St. Paul, and Denver respectively. 

Check out Photogrammar for some great images of 1930s-1940s Milwaukee!

todaysdocument
todaysdocument:

National Hispanic Heritage Month/Mes de la Herencia Hispana
National Hispanic Heritage Month is celebrated from September 15 to October 15 in celebration and recognition of the histories, cultures and contributions of American citizens whose ancestors came from Spain, Mexico, the Caribbean and Central and South America. 

AFIS billboard posters. Hispanic Heritage Month. Defense Billboard #81, 01/01/2000.National Archives Identifier: 6507500

This celebration started in 1968 as Hispanic Heritage Week under President Lyndon Johnson and was later expanded by President Ronald Reagan in 1988 to cover a 30-day period starting on September 15 and ending on October 15. It was enacted into law on August 17, 1988, on the approval of Public Law 100-402.
The day of September 15 is significant because it is the anniversary of independence for the Latin American countries Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras and Nicaragua. In addition, Mexico and Chile celebrate their independence on September 16 and September 18, respectively. Also, Columbus Day or Día de la Raza, which is October 12, falls within this 30 day period.
According to this Census, 50.5 million people or 16% of the population are of Hispanic or Latino origin. This represents a significant increase from 2000, which registered the Hispanic population at 35.3 million or 13% of the total U.S. population.
Share with us in this special annual tribute by learning and celebrating the generations of Hispanic Americans who have positively influenced and enriched our nation and society.
More about National Hispanic Heritage Month at: Prologue: Pieces of History » National Hispanic Heritage Month/Mes de la Herencia Hispana

todaysdocument:

National Hispanic Heritage Month/Mes de la Herencia Hispana

National Hispanic Heritage Month is celebrated from September 15 to October 15 in celebration and recognition of the histories, cultures and contributions of American citizens whose ancestors came from Spain, Mexico, the Caribbean and Central and South America. 

AFIS billboard posters. Hispanic Heritage Month. Defense Billboard #81, 01/01/2000.
National Archives Identifier: 6507500

This celebration started in 1968 as Hispanic Heritage Week under President Lyndon Johnson and was later expanded by President Ronald Reagan in 1988 to cover a 30-day period starting on September 15 and ending on October 15. It was enacted into law on August 17, 1988, on the approval of Public Law 100-402.

The day of September 15 is significant because it is the anniversary of independence for the Latin American countries Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras and Nicaragua. In addition, Mexico and Chile celebrate their independence on September 16 and September 18, respectively. Also, Columbus Day or Día de la Raza, which is October 12, falls within this 30 day period.

According to this Census, 50.5 million people or 16% of the population are of Hispanic or Latino origin. This represents a significant increase from 2000, which registered the Hispanic population at 35.3 million or 13% of the total U.S. population.

Share with us in this special annual tribute by learning and celebrating the generations of Hispanic Americans who have positively influenced and enriched our nation and society.

More about National Hispanic Heritage Month at: Prologue: Pieces of History » National Hispanic Heritage Month/Mes de la Herencia Hispana

Happy Friday!

Mitchell Hall was the first building on the new site of the Milwaukee Normal School. Previously known as “Old Main,” it was renamed after the Mitchell family in 1964. The hall now houses the Graduate School, departments of Africology, Art History, and Film, faculty offices for theatre and dance, and academic and administrative support offices.

Mitchell Hall, original building of State Normal School :: UWM Photo Collection

Mitchell Hall in winter :: UWM Photo Collection

Name change from Wisconsin State College to UWM on Mitchell Hall :: UWM Photo Collection

A little library transformation for your Thursday! 

The first image is an interior shot of the library in Greene Hall back in the 1930s when the building was owned by Milwaukee-Downer College. By the 1950s, this library in Mellencamp Hall featured lots of natural light and comfortable chairs. And in the 1970s…well, the Golda Meir Library features a good deal of brick.

All images from the UWM Photo Collection.